Green ICT in China Webinar

Presentation Source Links

Asia-Pac

Asia, Australia, Pacific

Research Labs are Biggest University Energy Consumers

Our recent post containing information about Green ICT issues at universities generated a lot of interest. Here is another insight: it is laboratory facilities are the big energy consumers on campuses.

Are the World's Most Populous Countries on the Path to Green ICT?

The 20 most populous countries comprise about half of the world's population. Yet 18 of these lie outside of what is generally perceived as the North American/Western Europe Green ICT nexus. These nations aspire to rapidly build out their ICT infrastructures. Nigeria, for example, already has GSM networks connecting ~50 million phones; over 130 radio and television broadcasters; domestic communications networks utilizing satellites, coastal submarine cable, land fiber, and microwave relays; and international connectivity via satellites and submarine cable.

These countries' ICT build-outs will have a significant future impact on global energy, carbon, and e-waste. Yet we hear very little about GreenICT challenges or progress in these countries. Go to our Global Green page to see what we've learned and to contribute by posting information about these countries.

The 18 countries, listed left-to-right in order of descending population, are:

Green Data Centers: Public

Here are some public data centers and ISPs offering various shades of green computing

China: Low Green ICT Activity Tied to Internal Cost Allocation Practices

An IDC survey finds that "IT decision makers in the Asia/Pacific region reveal that when green requirements are specified in a request for proposal (RFP), only 9.7% of the respondents in China say that they are mandatory. Compared to the average of 35.3% in the Asia/Pacific countries…China appears to be lagging behind in its efforts to promote the green movement…" The reason offered is instructive for all organizations.

Telling the Green ICT Story

Readers who have followed Vertatique since 2007 know that I find the photographs of and film about Edward Burtynsky make compelling arguments for getting a handle on our e-waste/cyberwaste stream. I was reminded of this by the reaction his story and work always receive when I talk about Green ICT.

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