recycle

ICT e-waste, cyber-waste, reuse & recycling

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) is a Key Green ICT Tool

Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) is emerging as an important mechanism to ensure more sustainable ICT gear. Here is a review of what EPR is and who is implementing it.

Madison, WI - How a City Greens Its Municipal IT Operation

City governments can show Green ICT leadership. Paul Kronberger, CIO of Madison (WI-USA), a city of 270,000 residents, tells me the municipality has taken these steps to improve the sustainability of its own operations.

E-Waste Comes Home

In an ironic turn of events, the e-waste being reprocessed in China is coming home to us through imports. This includes lead1 in our food.

How Green is the Microsoft Surface?

Apple attracted attention in 2012 because its iPad was so tightly assembled that it was not easily recycled. Now, it appears that Microsoft's Windows Surface tablet may be even less easily recycled.

How Green is the iPad?

It is easier to avoid controversy in the first place than extract oneself once one has invited it. Apple is finding that its decision to pull out of EPEAT, as described below, continues to dog the company even though Apple had quickly reversed that stance.

US Recycling Rates

We've identified almost 17 billion edge devices attached to our global ICT infrastructure. It turns out that the United States has a wide range of recycling rates for the different categories of e-gear. Which is best and which is worst?

Few States Require Recycling of Consumer Media Equipment

Few American states have mandatory e-waste recycling laws for consumer media devices other than TVs; Colorado is the latest to do so. Pennsylvania's new law covers e-readers, but that's about it.

Disposal of satellite television dishes is the latest concern but few jurisdictions require recycling. The New York Times reports, "Many say the dishes end up in landfills, polluting the environment…The Satellite Broadcasting and Communications Association is challenging [local removal ordinances]." We estimate there are almost 200 million satellite TV dishes worldwide.

Can Self-Healing Electronics Extend E-Gear's Service Life?

The University of Illinois has had a strong focus on e-waste through its Sustainable Electronics Initiative (SEI). Now, researchers at the University are experimenting with a technique that would enable electronic circuits to repair themselves. This holds the promise of longer service lives and therefore less e-waste. Here are excerpts from "Autonomic Restoration of Electrical Conductivity" in Advanced Materials.

Upgrades Drive Consumer Media Gear E-Waste

UK's Waste & Resources Action Programme (WARP) conducted a study of the Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) content of Household Waste Recycling Centres (HWRCs). What can we learn, besides UK greens' fondness for initials? Turns out media, not IT, gear is the largest category. Upgrades are driving this waste stream.

A Star Died So I Could Have an iPad

All the naturally-occurring elements in the universe are forged in the cosmic fusion reactors we call stars. This is true of the atoms in our our bodies and of those in our e-gear. We are truly stardust.

The process of fusing atomic nuclei together to form ever-more-complex atoms is called 'nucleosynthesis'. Average stars like our sun can power basic reactions like fusing hydrogen into helium.

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