Europe

Cryptocurrency Mining Is a Significant Component of ICT Electricity Consumption

We've tracked the growing environmental impact of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin since 2013. We've focused on cryptocurrency mining's GHG footprint, which has grown to equal that of large cities. Now, we learn that cryptocurrency transactions have a large footprint, as well.

IEEE Spectrum reported in October 2019 that researchers at the Federal Polytechnic School of Lausanne in Switzerland estimate that each Bitcoin transaction generates an estimated 300 kilograms. (Bitcoin transactions frequently exceed 300K/day.) "...Bitcoin broadcasts messages to its entire network to get everyone to confirm each transaction. In order for blockchains to reach consensus on the validity of all transactions, users must execute complex, energy-intensive computing 'proof of work' tasks." The researchers developed this estimate while working on a new algorithm to confirm transactions that could reduce the footprint to only a few grams per transaction.

Greenest Telecom Providers

The "C" in Green ICT is Communications. Green America reports that, "The four largest companies – AT&T, Verizon, Sprint and T-Mobile – collectively use more than 30 million MWh of electric power each year. AT&T and Verizon, the two leading US companies in the industry, have a combined electricity usage that could power 2.6 million homes for a year...A large portion of this energy (90%) powers wireless access networks, towers and other infrastructure allowing cell phone users to access data and connect nationwide." Here's how telecoms are doing from a Green ICT perspective.

How Long Do We Keep Our Devices?

It is difficult to get reliable data on how long we hold onto the 24 billion edge devices attached to the global ICT infrastructure. Diverse device types and cultural practices complicate the issue. So do changing purchase and lease plans. Here is our latest calculation on the average in-service life of a mobile device and a look at how unused devices are piling up in UK homes.

Green ICT Conferences

The most comprehensive directory of Green ICT conferences, workshops and other events around the world. Latest additions are events in China, Czech Republic and Germany.

Finding the Greenest Tablets

The availability of tablets suitable for Green ICT purchasing has declined percipitously over the past year. We could identify only three manufacturers offer one model each. The sluggish global market for tablets may account for manufacturers' lack of interest in certifying new models.

Finding the Greenest Office Equipment

Many Green ICT certification and registration programs cover categories of office equipment other than the major ones for which we publish separate articles. (See list to the right.) Our latest update revealed no new categories and no overall increase in the number of models available. We also note an EPA-recognized toner cartridge remanufacturing initative.

Finding the Greenest Mobile Phones

A full update of this survey is planned for later in the year. In the meantime, we are noting an achievement by USA carrier Sprint.

Number of Green ICT Conferences Continues to Plunge Worldwide

The number of Green ICT conferences and workshops to decline, now to only half as many as in 2013. They have almost disappeared from North America and Asia/Pacific, with Europe hosting over half. The good news is that we listed one in Africa and one in the Middle East.

More Efficient Supercomputers

Energy efficiency is becoming more important to supercomputers, as ever more powerful machines consume ever more energy. Japan and the United States lead energy-efficient supercomputing. (A liquid immersion ExaScaler module of the top machine - Shoubu system B - is pictured to the left.)

Finding the Greenest Computer Monitors and Projectors

There are hundreds of green-certified computer displays available and available models in most categories have increased since 2017. Here is how to find the most sustainable displays, including projectors, listed by international certification services.

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